My first AA meeting drove me to drink

maurin-quina-french-poster-affiche-leonetto-capielloI went to my first AA meeting on Friday. I thought I would try it, and I was struggling with wanting to “feel good” by drinking, so I was hoping it would help.

My fear about AA meetings — besides that they’d be awkward and tedious — is that I’d be so emotionally stressed by the experience that it would drive me to drink. I used to binge on powdered donuts after every therapy session, back in the day…

And this is basically what happened. 😦

Yes, I’ve learned from it. Yes, I’m embarrassed to admit it and hate to disappoint all of you who have been so supportive. Yes, it SUCKS to start at “Day 1” again, despite all of the days in between that I haven’t had a drink. Yes, I am convinced now that November 27, 2015 was my last drink. I want to be free.

I keep thinking about how Heya, Monster empathized with how painful it can be in the early days of trying over and over before it finally sticks. Yep. Here I am, right there. (Fork in eye…)

On the way back from the meeting I was feeling so down/stressed that I convinced myself that it wouldn’t count if I had a drink. (Seriously, what?) It’s just a test, I told myself. I needed to prove to myself once and for all that even a “nice” bottle of wine wouldn’t taste good and wouldn’t be worth it. I totally convinced myself that I would just pretend like it never happened and keep counting days.

And do you know what? I bought a really nice bottle of wine that I’ve loved in the past — and it tasted bad. I could taste the alcohol in a harsh and bitter way that I’ve never noticed before, and there was no upside. It wasn’t good. It wasn’t “gorgeous” or yummy. And probably thanks to the naltrexone injections that I’ve been getting, there was no euphoria. No buzz. No momentary surge. No thrill. NONE of what the dopamine glutton that lives in my wine addict brain thought she needed. Just. this. once.

Still, as I was deeply into the “experiment” that I told myself “wouldn’t count” against my days AF, that I would just “pretend like it never happened,” I drank a second glass of wine. That was it. I didn’t finish the bottle and the next morning, completely nauseated and with a screaming, pounding headache, I poured the rest of the bottle down the sink.

I spent half the day in bed.

THIS is why. I quit drinking. This is why.

Wine will never be the answer to my dopamine levels being low. I see this now. I get it. I have to find new ways to feel euphoria. New paths to goodness and joy. Pleasure. Wine will never lead me there. I finally really really know that now. It may take time and I may have to suck it up and wait it out, but wine is not the answer to get me there.

I guess the good news is that I’ve had so little to drink in the last few months that my body is REALLY reacting to wine like the poison it is, from even a little bit. Before I quit drinking, two bottles of wine in one night wouldn’t have made me sick like that. This is good. Fucking ass hole wine goblin. I’m going to starve your sorry ass. You won’t win the next round.

I’m sorry to disappoint myself. I’m sorry to disappoint you. And of course once the wine goblin had his way and I had done it, the fog lifted and I knew I couldn’t lie and pretend it didn’t happen. Addicts are liars. I’m no liar.

So, if we’re counting days — which we are — I’m back at Day 2. Fuck me. Day 2.

I’m sorry. I’m embarrassed.

I’m so tired of thinking about this all the time. I think I’m going to start Belle’s “Sober Jumpstart” class on December 1. One more tool of support to get me through the tough first 100 days. One more tool.

Fuck, I’d take 30 days at this point.

I’ll get there. The wine goblin may have won this round, but he isn’t going to win the war. I want freedom.

I’m going to make it this time and I hope you’ll stick with me. You’ve made a big difference in my getting this far. Here’s to picking myself up and starting again.

Rachel.

 

 

 

 

13 thoughts on “My first AA meeting drove me to drink

  1. You’ve done the right thing to be open about it to yourself and those you normally share with (here). It makes a huge difference, I find anyway. Secrets make us even more sick and nothing good can ever come of it. Keep writing whatever happens. Hugs!

    Liked by 2 people

  2. Don’t count the days. I counted before; now I don’t. All you need to focus on is right now, today, don’t drink. I know this sounds like the AA “one day at a time” thing, but it’s not. It’s one minute at a time. One second at the time. Oh, and yeah, f___ that goblin. He’s not worth it.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Thanks, ROE… Since the end of October I’ve probably only had 4 days when I had a drink. Going back to August, my drinking was down by easily two-thirds. Starting back at Day 1 doesn’t give me any credit for that — most importantly to myself. I’m actually doing pretty darned awesome! 🙂

      Today I won’t drink. And more than that, I want the mental freedom that being a non- drinker will bring.

      F the goblin. 🙂 I just may buy that French poster on my post as a good riddance! Hehe.

      Liked by 3 people

  3. Hi Rachel!
    I am glad you are adding more supports to help you!
    One thing I had to do was be really honest with myself, because I used to hide my drinking from hubs.
    xo
    Wendy

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Rachel, never disappointment here. Never worry about that, and/or being judged. We know. We’ve been there. We’ve convinced ourselves and those around us that we are Fine. And for the record, the hubs’ mentor would always get mad at people when they would say, “I’m fine.” His definition (and I love it) is: FINE=Fucked Up, Insecure, Neurotic, and Emotional. Never trust anyone who says they are ever again. *smile* Love the poster. Love your resolve. Love the sober days you have behind you, and the sober days in your future. You are doing awesome/amazing. -HM.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Hi Rachel, don’t be embarrassed we’ve all been there. I think this slip is what you needed. My last experiment in September was very similar. I got no enjoyment from it and saw it as the poison it really is. Never forget how crap that wine tasted and made you feel. This is your time! I’m proud of your honesty. Onwards

    Liked by 2 people

  6. Only a mere slip! I had a few right in the beginning too. Just like I you I realized how badly I DID NOT WANT THAT. So in a way, it’s good and maybe you did prove to yourself that alcohol is not what you want anymore. Move forward, nothing to be embarrassed about. As far as I’m concerned you’re still sober, you didn’t get drunk, didn’t really fall off the wagon, just sort of leaned out really far:) In the scheme of things, by the time you get 100 days, or 6 months or a year, this little thing will not matter.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. No judgment, no shaming, no finger-wagging…we get it. We’ve been there, and we have nothing but love and support for you. The Wine Goblin, on the other hand, gets no love, understanding, or support. He just has a lot of sober men and women–which includes you–gunning for his ass.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. I just wanted to chime in and agree with that people have already said. No shame, it’s all part of the learning. And only 4 days drinking since October, as you said above in a comment, is freaking amazing! Writing about consciousness, William James said you can never have the same experience twice because the second time includes what you’ve learned and done and thought and lived since then. I find that helpful (now on my third serious round of quitting) to realize the earlier sober days and stretches didn’t disappear. They are all part of what we’re all figuring out. Oh dear, long comment again! Take care. xo

    Liked by 1 person

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